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Dr. Greg Davis on Medicine

Dr. Greg Davis on Medicine

  • This week Dr. Greg talks with Heather Bush who was recently named permanent dean of the UK College of Public Health. Under her leadership as acting dean, the college has seen growth in research, teaching and service. The college has also expanded efforts to recognize and teach how different perspectives can thrive in public health. In this conversation, Bush talks about the role of public health in our everyday lives and lays out her vision for the college as it moves into its third decade at UK.
  • National Cancer Institute
    In March, we wear blue to recognize Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women. It’s estimated that 106,590 new cases of colon cancer and 46,220 new cases of rectal cancer will be diagnosed in 2024. Kentucky has the fourth highest rate of death from colon cancer in the nation. Dr. Greg revisits an interview with local gastroenterologist Dr. Elizabeth Holt.
  • A growing number of physicians and researchers are tackling a thorny question - how does the American ethos affect the quality and level of our healthcare? Dr. Greg talks with Frederick J. Zimmerman, PhD, faculty associate at the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and a professor of health policy management in the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, about an article he co-wrote: Population Health In America: Is Culture Stopping Us Dead In Our Tracks? It appeared in the publication 'Health Affairs' in 2022.
  • What can seem like an intimidating topic is, in reality, quite relatable – from the moment we wake up in the morning, science is happening all around us – it colors everything we do. Making science accessible in a fun and interactive way is important in helping people feel more connected not only to science, but to the city of Lexington as a whole. Dr. Greg speaks with Dr. Lou Hirsch, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Martin-Gatton College of Agriculture, Food and Environment Department of Plant Pathology, for a preview of "Everything is Science" February 19-23 in Lexington.Everything is Science: Make It Make Sense will occur February 19-23, 2024, from 6-8 pm daily.  Monday, 2/19: TOUCHEthereal Cornerstone (401 S Limestone)Tuesday, 2/20: VISIONEthereal Public House (102 W. Vine Street)Wednesday, 2/21: TASTE Old North Bar at Greyline Station (101 W. Loudon Avenue) Thursday, 2/22: HEARINGPivot Brewing (1400 Delaware Avenue)Friday, 2/23: SMELL Void Sake Co. (819 National Ave., Suite 120) All events are free and open to the public. No registration is required. 
  • Neurologist Jordan Clay, M.D., with UK HealthCare's Kentucky Neuroscience Institute separates myth from fact about epilepsy and goes over the do's and don'ts when it comes to first aid treatment for someone experiencing a seizure.
  • Special cross-over episode! Is it Dr. Greg? Is it One on One? Well, it's BOTH. This week Karyn Czar traded places with WUKY's Dr. Greg Davis to get a fresh perspective on his work as a forensic pathologist and professor emeritus during his tenure at the University of Kentucky.
  • We’re continuing our theme of New Year New You segments. One of the most common New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight and get in shape; and we've discussed before how exercise can be not only beneficial for the body but our minds as well. In this week’s edition of Dr. Greg Davis on Medicine we revisit an in depth interview with Jennifer Heisz, author of Move the Body, Heal the Mind (available through Harper Collins). Heisz is an Associate Professor in Kinesiology and Associate Director (Seniors) of the Physical Activity Centre of Excellence at McMaster University.
  • Our illustrious host Dr. Greg Davis is taking a few weeks off and we’re continuing our theme of New Year New You segments. If one of your resolutions is to handle stress better in 2024, we offer this interview Dr. Greg did with Jackie Carroll – health coach for UK Health & Wellness about acute and chronic stress reduction.
  • We’re continuing our theme of New Year New You segments, and if one of your resolutions is to get more sleep, you’re in luck as we revisit this interview with Dr. Lauren Whitehurst, an assistant professor of psychology from the College of Arts and Sciences. She talks about how sleep is tied to our emotions and how depriving ourselves of it opens the door to a myriad of health problems.
  • One of the most common New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight and get in shape. But joining a gym or a spinning class can sometimes be intimidating and cost-prohibitive. In this week’s edition of Dr. Greg Davis on Medicine we revisit an in depth interview with Antonia Malchik, author of the best-selling book – A Walking Life: about the past and future of walking’s role in our shared humanity. She talks not only about the physical benefits of walking but also the mental and emotional boost we can get by lacing up our shoes and putting our best foot forward.
  • Dr. Greg Davis brings us a cancer-journey update from friend and WUKY colleague Karyn Czar who received a bone marrow transplant as part of her treatment for multiple myeloma almost three months ago. In this particular conversation Karyn details the mental and emotional challenges too often obscured by the physical recovery process. She also is sharing her story in hopes of ending the stigma associated with talking openly about mental health issues. Karyn maintains that if all goes according to plan she will return to the WUKY airwaves sometime next month.
  • Xylazine, a veterinary anesthetic commonly referred to as “tranq,” has recently made its way into the illicit drug supply as a drug adulterant to enhance the effects of fentanyl, a potent opioid that can be lethal even in small amounts. The new drug combination has resulted in a 1,127% increase in xylazine-positive overdose mortalities in the American south from 2020 to 2021, and results in other problematic health effects including tissue necrosis. Now two researchers at the University of Kentucky will use a $2.65M grant to study how xylazine and fentanyl change the brain’s signaling pathways. This week Dr. Greg talks with Cassandra Gipson-Reichardt, associate professor in the University of Kentucky College of Medicine’s Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, who is conducting the study with fellow professor Terry Hinds, Jr.