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Lex PD shares tips to prevent catalytic converter thefts

police
Josh James
/
WUKY
Lexington police cruiser



Amid a nationwide rash of catalytic converter thefts that has Kentucky lawmakers calling for harsher penalties, Lexington police are advising car owners on how to avoid becoming a victim. WUKY's Arlo Barnette has details.

Platinum,palladium, and rhodium; those are the precious minerals in catalytic converters that the Lexington Police Department says have become more valuable over the past two years. It’s estimated that Kentucky saw a 234% increase in catalytic converter thefts from 2020 to 2021. LPD detectives who specialize in those thefts have solved over 100 such cases since January 2021, leading to 20 individuals being charged.

Inaddition to anti-theft devices, police recommend engraving your vehicleidentification number and phone number into your catalytic converter orpainting it a bright color, and parking in a well-lit area at home. When parking in public, try to park near fixed objects that limit groundclearance around the vehicle and in areas where pedestrian traffic is high.SenateBill 114 would require scrap yards to obtain documentation proving ownership from those trying to sell a catalytic converter, and boost thepenalties for violators to a Class B Misdemeanor, punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a fine of up to $250. The measure passed with bipartisan support and now awaits the governor’s signature.

In addition to anti-theft devices, police recommend engraving your vehicle identification number and phone number into your catalytic converter or
painting it a bright color, and parking in a well-lit area at home.

When parking in public, try to park near fixed objects that limit ground clearance around the vehicle and in areas where pedestrian traffic is
high.

Senate Bill 114 would require scrap yards to obtain documentation proving ownership from those trying to sell a catalytic converter, and boost the penalties for violators to a Class B Misdemeanor, punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a fine of up to $250. The measure passed with bipartisan support and now awaits the governor’s signature.