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The Great Compromiser And The Great Emancipator: Why Clay Was Lincoln's 'Beau Ideal' Politician

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Library of Congress
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This weekend the Lexington History Museum is co-sponsoring events celebrating our city’s ties to the 16th US president and native Kentuckian Abraham Lincoln.  This year’s overall theme is Henry Clay’s influence on Lincoln.  As part of the celebration the LHM brought noted Kentucky historian Dr. John Kleber to the Lexington Public Library to talk about his research on the two political legends.  WUKY's Alan Lytle sat in on his presentation and then talked one on one with Dr. Kleber.  It may surprise you to learn that there's precious little evidence to prove that the two men actually ever met.

clayandlincoln_lecture.mp3
Kentucky historian Dr. John Kleber talks about Henry Clay's influence on Abraham Lincoln as part of the 2019 Lincoln Days Festival.

Dr. John E. Kleber is a noted historian with expertise in the state of Kentucky. He is a beloved and active member of the University of Louisville's McConnell Center, where he attends the yearly retreat and interacts regularly in extracurricular activities with students.

He is best-known for being the editor of The Kentucky Encyclopedia and the Encyclopedia of Louisville, published in 1992 and 2000 respectively. He is a nationally recognized expert in U.S. religious history and the American frontier, with an additional interest in oral history techniques.

He taught at Morehead State University from 1968-96, where he was awarded the Distinguished Teacher Award in 1982 as well as the Distinguished Researcher Award in 1992-93.

Bitten by the radio bug as a teenager, Alan Lytle got his start start more than 30 years ago volunteering in Clermont County, Ohio for WOBO-FM. He graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Broadcasting from the University of Cincinnati and worked at a variety of radio stations in the Cincinnati market, then made the move to Lexington in the mid-1990s.
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