WUKY In Depth

In depth stories from the WUKY news team.

UK Libraries

All this month we are visiting with Reinette Jones who along with colleague Rob Aken, oversee the UK Libraries’ Notable Kentucky African Americans Database – a free online resource for anyone who wants to know more about the history of our commonwealth.  The database is full of little known stories of achievement, injustice, and agency of African Americans, past and present, and this week we look at the rise of African American attorneys in Kentucky.


AP Photo/Nati Harnik

It’s a ways out still from Kentucky’s primary elections in May. But with the troubled Iowa caucuses getting the Democratic presidential nominating process off to a rocky start, WUKY’s Josh James spoke with University of Kentucky election expert Joshua Douglas about voter confidence – and what officials can do to win some of it back. 

UK Libraries

All this month we are visiting with Reinette Jones who along with colleague Rob Aken, oversee the UK Libraries’ Notable Kentucky African Americans Database – a free online resource for anyone who wants to know more about the history of our commonwealth.  The database is full of little known stories of achievement, injustice, and agency of African Americans, past and present, and today we are tackling a persistent myth surrounding a period in our nation’s history known as the Great Migration when millions of African Americans, whether escaping Jim Crow policies or simply seeking economic opportunities, relocated from the deep South to industrial cities in the North.


UK Libraries

All this month we are visiting with Reinette Jones who along with colleague Rob Aken, oversee the UK Libraries’ Notable Kentucky African Americans Database – a free online resource for anyone who wants to know more about the history of our commonwealth.  The database is full of little known stories of achievement, injustice, and agency of African Americans, past and present, and today we are shining the spotlight on Joseph N. Kendall, a Kentucky football great not enough people know about.


Josh James / WUKY

WUKY's Alan Lytle talks with Kentucky Gazette editor and publisher Laura Cullen Glasscock on the progress of several bills in this Legislative Session and whether calls for a return to civility and bipartisanship have been heeded by lawmakers on both sides of the aisle.


UK Libraries

All month long WUKY's Alan Lytle will be visiting with Reinette Jones who along with colleague Rob Aken, oversee the UK Libraries’ Notable Kentucky African Americans Database – a free online resource for anyone who wants to know more about the history of our commonwealth.  The database is full of little known stories of achievement, injustice, and agency of African Americans, past and present.  We’ll be highlighting specific entries and categories in the weeks to come but today a general discussion of how the project came to be.


AP Photo/Bryan Woolston

Friday was the deadline for candidates to file with the Kentucky Secretary of State’s office for the May Primaries and as you might expect there was a flurry of activity on that last day, not to mention a few surprises.  On this week’s Capitol Chat Laura Cullen Glasscock, editor and publisher of the Frankfort-based Kentucky Gazette talks matchups with WUKY's Alan Lytle.


LRC Public Information

It’s a new year, a new decade, and a new era in Frankfort as the 2020 Kentucky General Assembly gavels into session Tuesday.  This week on Capitol Chat we get a preview of coming attractions, and perhaps distractions, from Laura Cullen Glasscock, editor and publisher of the Kentucky Gazette.


It’s estimated that the number of human beings that have ever lived is around 107 billion. It’s also estimated that around half, about 52 billion, have died as a result of mosquito borne illness.

Climate scientists are predicting that places like central Kentucky will see higher than normal temperatures and increased rainfall as result of climate change, creating an environment perfect for what’s been called humankind’s deadliest predator.

National Park Service

The Civil War was just days old when the first enslaved men, women, and children began fleeing their plantations to seek refuge inside the lines of the Union army as it moved deep into the heart of the Confederacy. In the years that followed, hundreds of thousands more would make a mass exodus from slavery to freedom.  Dr. Amy Murrell Taylor, an associate professor in the UK history department has written a powerful book about this period in our history.  Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps' draws on an extraordinary survey of these make-shift camps throughout the country, including at Camp Nelson in Central Kentucky, revealing as never before the everyday experiences of these refugees.  In fact it recently won the prestigious Frederick Douglass Book Prize for 2019.  She discusses her project with WUKY's Alan Lytle.


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