2019 Kentucky Legislative Session

Josh James / WUKY

Pension relief for regional universities, local health departments, and other "quasi-governmental" entities topped the agenda on the last day of the 2019 regular legislative session, and late Thursday lawmakers delivered. But that final product is already under fire.

Josh James / WUKY

Kentucky’s top education official is promising no disciplinary action is in store for teachers who took part in multiple "sick-outs" over the last few weeks, but the assurance comes with an asterisk. 

Josh James / WUKY

It’s comparatively quiet in Frankfort this morning as legislators now wait to see whether any of their efforts will be nixed by Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin.  Last Thursday night saw a bevy of activity with bills on abortion, campus free speech, pension relief, new tax and budget measures and a bill to put restrictions on the duties of the Secretary of State.  Today on Capitol Chat we talk about what may or may not be ahead this session with Kentucky Gazette editor and publisher Laura Cullen Glasscock.

Josh James / WUKY

Kentucky's education commissioner on Friday would not rule out disciplining teachers who used their sick days to close multiple school districts so they could protest at the state Capitol.

Josh James / WUKY

Time to exhale. The Kentucky General Assembly spent Thursday rushing to beat the veto deadline, delivering bills dealing with abortion, the powers of the secretary of state, solar energy rates, campus free speech, along with new tax and budget measures, to the governor for his consideration. Here's a breakdown of the major bills passed on day 29 of the 30-day session.

Josh James / WUKY

Time is running out for several pieces of legislation proposed for this year’s short session.  This week on Capitol Chat Laura Cullen Glasscock, editor and publisher of the Frankfort based Kentucky Gazette updates us on some bills that might make it through both chambers and others that appear to be on life support. 

Josh James / WUKY

Kentucky's GOP-dominated Senate is balking at a request from Republican Gov. Matt Bevin's administration to borrow $50 million in an election year to fix up the state's park system.

Josh James / WUKY

WUKY's Alan Lytle and Kentucky Gazette editor and publisher Laura Cullen Glasscock discuss the fate of a number of bills and legislative issues in the final days of the short session.  Topics include a measure allowing Kentucky to join several other states in a call for a Constitutional Convention, closing a large loophole in the sexual harassment law and a significant change to the state's open records law.  Plus, are there any bills that may garner a veto from Republican Governor Matt Bevin?  All that and more are on this week's Capitol Chat.

Josh James / WUKY

The Kentucky Senate voted Thursday to allow state officials to avoid having their legal cases heard by a circuit judge who has drawn the ire of Gov. Matt Bevin for some of his rulings. The measure, sponsored by the Senate's top leader, won passage by a vote of 26-9 in the Republican-dominated chamber and now goes to the House, which is also under GOP control.

AP File Photo

Kentucky lawmakers gave final approval Thursday to a school safety bill intended to boost police protection and counseling in response to a shooting more than a year ago that killed two students at a western Kentucky high school.

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