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Dr. Greg Davis

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Dr. Greg Davis on Medicine
  • BlackWomenIPVpic
    UK Now
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    A study from the College of Social Work at the University of Kentucky showed Black survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) receive significantly less workplace support than their White counterparts. Dr. Greg talks with study co-author Kathryn Showalter, PhD, of the University of Kentucky College of Social Work.
  • Bruce Willis
    Charles Sykes/Charles Sykes/Invision/AP
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    Invision
    The recent announced retirement of actor Bruce Willis due to complications with aphasia has brought the condition national attention. Aphasia is an acquired language disorder usually resulting from a stroke or trauma in the brain’s dominant hemisphere. The condition causes a disconnect in the areas of the brain responsible for language and can impact a person’s ability to speak, read, write, and listen (ranging from very mild to severe.)There is no cure for aphasia and most patients struggle with lifelong side effects. This week on Dr. Greg Davis on Medicine we talk all things aphasia with Tim Ainger, clinical neuropsychologist and an assistant professor of neurology with the UK College of Medicine and the Kentucky Neuroscience Institute.
  • Researchers at the University of Kentucky are looking for participants in a study focused on gaining insights and perspectives from gender and sexual minority individuals and their families. The goal is to learn how the healthcare field can better serve these individuals, their families, and communities. This week Dr. Greg talks about theBarriers to Healthcare study with principal investigator Kelly Hill, UK Psychiatrist and Medical Director of the Adolescent Behavioral HealthUnit.
  • You've probably never heard of L.A.T.E. It's an acronym that stands for Limbic-predominant, Age-related TDP-43 Encephalopathy. It's a form of dementia which the symptoms often mimic Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Greg talks with colleague Dr. Pete Nelson, a researcher with the UK Sanders Brown Center on Aging about a new clinical trial for L.A.T.E. patients.
  • Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, and Kentucky is home to the highest rates of cancer incidence and mortality in the country. The problem is significantly concentrated in the Appalachian region of the state, an area widely known for its culture and history of tobacco growth and use. This week Dr. Greg talks to Nathan Vanderford, director of the Markey Cancer Center’s Appalachian Career Training in Oncology or ACTION program.
  • Aspects of science and research touch our lives every day, but all too often as adults we forget the sense of wonder and interest that we may have had in science when we were children. Everything is Science, Lexington’s free community science festival aims to bring some of that back into our lives. Dr. Greg gets a preview of the week-long city-wide science festival from UK College of Pharmacy PHD candidate Lauren Weaver, one of the event's organizers.
  • The COVID-19 pandemic has been difficult for parents, students and let's not forget the teachers. This week Dr. Greg talks with Leslie Davis; English teacher, head track coach and an assistant soccer coach at Lafayette High School in Lexington, about some of the unique health issues teachers face and how they can positively influence the health of their students. Full disclosure: Leslie is Greg's daughter.
  • The annual Substance Use Research Event (SURE), formerly known as Substance Use Research Day, showcases the translational research conducted at the University of Kentucky focusing on substance use and substance use disorder. Dr. Greg gets a preview from Hilary Surratt, associate professor in the Center for Health Services Research and the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine.
  • The University of Kentucky is participating in a nationwide study that seeks to understand why some people have prolonged symptoms (long COVID) or develop new or returning symptoms after an acute bout of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Dr. Greg Davis talks with Zach Porterfield, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor in the UK Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, who is co-leading the study.
  • Alex Flannery worked as a clinician in the intensive care unit for six years. During his tenure in critical care, the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy assistant professor and 2011 graduate, saw many cases of sepsis and acute kidney injury, which have no cure. Flannery’s background in pharmacology sparked an interest in learning more about how to treat these diseases. He talks about what he's learned on this week's edition of Dr. Greg Davis on Medicine.
  • Vaneet Arora, Associate Director - Clinical Microbiology in the UK College of Medicine shares the latest info on the omicron variant of COVID-19 and talks about UK and the University of Louisville’s participation in a public health study funded by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, looking at genomic surveillance of the virus via wastewater sampling.
  • Vaneet Arora, Associate Director - Clinical Microbiology in the UK College of Medicine shares the latest info on the omicron variant of COVID-19 and talks about UK and the University of Louisville’s participation in a public health study funded by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, looking at genomic surveillance of the virus via wastewater sampling.